Proven Sales Pitch Examples and Pitching Tips for Freelancers

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EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION: I’ve recently had LOADS of email requests for sales pitch examples and tips for pitching to companies as a freelancer. I figured the best way to produce this article was to commission Michelle to write it. 

Why? Well, she sent a pitch for an article to me a while back, which I accepted. It was in the form of the “Cold Pitch” example shown below. Since then, Michelle’s gone on to write several great articles for the site. So, she clearly knows how to write a pitch that results in ongoing work! She kindly agreed to share some of her own sales pitch examples as part of the guide too.

While Michelle is a freelance writer, there’s probably some wisdom you can gain here if you’re pitching for other types of work. With that explanation out the way, I shall hand over to her – but I’ve also added a section at the end with some additional tips of my own.


One of the most important points of being a freelancer is – of course – finding business. Without clients giving you work and sending money your way, life falls apart pretty fast if this is what you do full time!

A tried and true way to gain new clients and new business is the sales pitch letter. It outlines who you are and what you can do for a business. It’s the digital equivalent of shaking hands, telling people what you do for a living and gathering business cards.

But there’s an art to it.

It’s easy to make a pitch letter too long or too irrelevant. So below I’ll cover some top sales pitch examples, focusing on some formats that have worked for me over the years.

Sales Pitch Examples for Job Boards

When it comes to sales pitches for legit job ads (look at this to avoid the scammy ones), I have three types of sales pitch examples I tend to send based on the job ads themselves.

For job ads that emphasize that they want an experienced writer I use the following format:

Dear Recruiter:

I am writing in response to the job ad you posted for a writer with ProBlogger. I think I would be a great fit, as I am a proven writer with a stellar adaptability to a variety of topics.

[OUTLINE WORK EXPERINCE IN RELATION TO YOUR INDUSTRY]

I started writing in the professional world as an intern with the Irish American Post, an internet publication. There, I routinely met deadlines from home for 2,500 word articles and juggled a large amount of research from various publications, as well as interviews with sources.

I worked on staff for a publisher that specialized in remodeling magazines. I wrote long feature stories and short company descriptions. I also edited the magazine from cover to cover. The workforce was mainly virtual, so I have a lot of experience communicating effectively from a home office.

[EXPLAIN PERSONAL SITUATION AND HOW IT BENEFITS THE PROSPECT]

For a little about me personally, I live just outside Milwaukee, WI. I work as a full-time freelance writer, which means I’m available throughout the business day and open to ongoing projects.

[DIRECT PROSPECT TO EXAMPLES OF PAST EXPERIENCE]

To view a list of my credentials, publications and clips, visit  http://www.clippings.me/users/michellelovrine and see my attached resume.

[IF THE JOB AD WANTS RATES, I PUT THEM HERE]

[LEAVE ON A FRIENDLY NOTE THAT KEEPS COMMUNICATION OPEN]

Thank you for taking the time to review my credentials, and please don’t hesitate to contact me to discuss the role further.

[END IN A WAY THAT DIRECTS PEOPLE TO YOUR PORTFOLIO AND PERTINENT SOCIAL MEDIA]

Sincerely,

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michellelovrine

Online Portfolio: http://www.clippings.me/users/michellelovrine

 

Some ads want to know what you have done in the past that matches the type of work they are looking for people to complete. In that case, I provide an edited version of the same letter.

Dear Recruiter:

I am writing in response to the job ad you posted for a writer with ProBlogger. I think I would be a great fit, as I am a proven writer with a stellar adaptability to a variety of topics.

I have experience writing about sustainability, and I am very passionate about the topic. You can see samples of my work at the following links:

[I LIST GOOD QUALITY; RELEVANT LINKS HERE]

For a little about me personally, I live just outside Milwaukee, WI. I work as a full-time freelance writer, which means I’m available throughout the business day and open to ongoing projects.

To view a list of my credentials, publications and clips, visit  http://www.clippings.me/users/michellelovrine and see my attached resume.

Thank you for taking the time to review my credentials, and please don’t hesitate to contact me to discuss the role further.

Sincerely,

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager

[SOCIAL AND PORTFOLIO LINKS, AS BEFORE]

 

Some ads are short and sweet and will only talk about the role they are looking to fill in more general terms. Many ads will even ask that you keep your application short. For ads like that, I reply in kind, by keeping it short and sweet:

Dear Recruiter:

I am writing in response to the job ad you posted for a writer with ProBlogger. I think I would be a great fit, as I am a proven writer with a stellar adaptability to a variety of topics.

For a little about me personally, I live just outside Milwaukee, WI. I work as a full-time freelance writer, which means I’m available throughout the business day and open to ongoing projects.

To view a list of my credentials, publications and clips, visit  http://www.clippings.me/users/michellelovrine and see my attached resume.

Thank you for taking the time to review my credentials, and please don’t hesitate to contact me to discuss the role further.

Sincerely,

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager

[SOCIAL AND PORTFOLIO LINKS, AS BEFORE]

As you can see, these are different sales pitch examples built from the same script. That makes it easy to apply to many different ads quickly. The key to keeping ad applications less time consuming is to have an easily customizable script.

The Importance of Brevity

I really can’t emphasize how important short and sweet is. For a while, I was outlining everything I had ever done. I had a lull in my work and really wanted to impress people. So I was using this script:

Dear Recruiter:

I am writing to you after reviewing your job post for _________, and I believe I would be a great fit for this position. I have proven myself to be a reliable, deadline-oriented writer with a stellar adaptability for a variety of topics. Currently, I provide both byline and ghostwritten blog posts for a number of business clients.

I am adaptable to a wide range of business writing styles. I provide content that has in-depth research, data-driven examples, an approachable tone, engaging topics and calls to action to use the services each company provides.

As some examples, I’ve attached two mock B2B blog posts for a marketing company blog and a toner buyback program blog respectively.

You can see some _____(relevant topic) blog posts I wrote at the following links:

For over two years, I also worked for a publisher that specialized in remodeling magazines. I wrote long feature stories about home products and short company descriptions alike. Also, I edited the magazines from cover to cover…

And it was going for three fairly long paragraphs after that! I was attaching samples and showing profiles and having individual links to blog posts all in one email. It doubled my application time and drastically cut my response rate! It was just too long. Looking back, people probably didn’t know what to look at.

Keep it simple – keep it short and sweet. Sometimes one link to a really good portfolio can speak for itself.

Cold Pitching

Cold pitching requires a different approach. In case you’re new to cold pitching, this is when you are the one to approach a possible client, and not as a result of seeing an ad.

Cold pitching

You’ll usually do your research on them as a company (or publication in a writer’s case), and then send a letter pitching for some possible work you could do for them. You may tell them about a story they could run that you could write, you may pitch them on marketing services or you may notice their website is outdated and offer your services as a web developer.

For cold pitching, it’s incredibly important you can show them what you can do. Rather than focusing on past experience, as you would with a more traditional job ad, it’s your job with the cold pitch to convince THEM that THEY need your services. A job gets posted because someone already knows they need a writer, developer, marketer or other service, and they’re looking for the person with the right experience for the job. But with cold pitching, it’s up to you to tell them they do need your services, because they’re probably not aware of that yet.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: Trying to incorporate the same strategy into a pitch to a specific job can work too, in my opinion. It can sometimes be hard to do, but if you can try to intersperse “I this…” and “I that….” with examples of what the client can expect from you this can strengthen a pitch.)

I find offering a specific idea or service to be valuable for cold pitching. I’m a writer, so I focus on the specifics of an article I feel someone could use. Here’s an example of an article pitch letter I had circulating:

Dear Editor:

After reviewing your site, I want to pitch a story called, “Impress Your Customers, Boost Your Sales.”

Returning and repeat buyers account for over 40 percent of U.S. revenue, despite only making up 8 percent of visitors, according to the Adobe Digital Index Report. On top of that, returning purchasers generate three to seven times more revenue per visit, and five shoppers generate the same amount of revenue per visit as one repeat purchaser.

So it’s never been more important to do everything in your power to retain customers so they’re more likely to become repeat customers. That means investing in customer loyalty programs to boost engagement and providing consistent customer support.

This article will cover:

  • Why happy customers mean bigger sales: Key statistics on why you want to keep your customers happy. For instance, according to an American Express survey from 2011, 78 percent of consumers have stopped transactions or not made a purchase they were going to make because of a bad service experience.
  • How to make the most of customer loyalty programs: Boost sales through methods like rebate/cash back programs, frequency clubs and points programs.
  • How to give the best customer support: Keeping customers around through the best business practices like customer-journey consistency, emotional consistency and communication consistency, as found by McKinsey.

 

I estimate the post being around 800 words. Feel free to get in contact with me to discuss the assignment. Otherwise, if I don’t hear anything within two weeks [date], I will assume you are not interested and pitch the story elsewhere.

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager

Notice how I focus on specifics. I have a clear view of what the article will be about, including a full introduction and an outline of the article’s body with supporting statistics and research.

For story pitches, I also leave a date that they have to get back to me by so I can move on, rather than waiting with the article in limbo. A few days before the date approaches, you can optionally check in with the contact, as well.

This may look different for other types of services provided. For instance, other sales pitch examples may outline:

  • What you can do specifically to make the client’s website better (details about SEO optimization, etc.)
  • What you specialize in for marketing services, and any statistics that show how you have boosted client sales in the past
  • Possible graphic design ideas for the client’s brand

These take a lot of time to customize, so I find they work best for potential clients that I really believe in and want to have a relationship with.

Should you ever mention price in your sales pitches?   

It may be tempting to lay it all out there with pricing so you only get responses from people willing to pay what you’re willing to work for.

That’s not a bad line of reasoning in itself. However, I find getting a dialogue going before pricing statements opens more room for negotiation. Discussing the project first also allows me to know what I should charge based on how much time it will take – then I can stick to my needed hourly rate.

Mentioning money

The only time I personally bring up pricing in pitches is when someone in an ad specifically asks for rates up front. Then I’ll usually tuck in my rates (usually a per word rate) above the line when I thank people for their time, as I’ve shown above. I find it works best to outline the experience I bring to the table and then state what my rates are.

If you’re wondering what you should charge for rates, you can read about how to avoid undercharging here.

Editor’s Tips

I should emphasise that the sales pitch examples above are what have proved to work for Michelle. There’s no right or wrong way to create a sales pitch, and people have success with all kinds of inventive tricks and different methods. I once read an article from someone having huge success on Upwork by sending custom video applications to every job!

With that in mind, I’m going to finish with a few final tips:

1. Lots of advice about pitching for work emphasises staying away from too much use of “I can do this,” and “I’ve done that” statements. When I edited this article, I noticed that Michelle does use plenty of statements like this – and gets work from her pitches. This raises an interesting question!

I think both views have some relevance; Wherever possible, it is a good idea to highlight what the client gets rather than what you give. However, having written hundreds of pitches myself, I know that trying to tweak the wording to avoid all the “I” statements often results in a clumsy and awkward sounding pitch. It’s all about balance.

And remember – you can still start a sentence with “I” and end it with a benefit!

2. Clients always like it if you do a bit of homework on their business before you apply. Dropping in some information you only know because you’ve browsed their blog and social media feeds will often serve you well.

3. A tactic that’s worked for me is to tailor pitches and put them in a similar style and tone to the job ad. However, it’s perhaps fair to say that while some clients will appreciate this, others may just think you’re trying to be too clever.

4. It’s rarely a good idea to hide your personality too much when you produce a pitch.

One of the big benefits of freelancing is working with people you’re “compatible” with – it’s better to be yourself and accept that sometimes you’re not going to be a “fit,” than to begin a client relationship pretending to be someone else!

5. Part of being a freelancer is sending out a LOT of pitches. Many of them will mark the last you ever hear of that particular job or company. Don’t allow it to break you heart, or you won’t last long!

6. Always proofread your pitches before sending. Clients do notice mistakes, and there’s nothing worse than noticing one yourself after you’ve already hit “send.” (Yes, I’ve been there myself many times!)

7. When you’re pitching for a specific job, always tailor your pitch appropriately. Lots of freelancers play a “numbers game,” and send out loads of “boiler plate” pitches without properly reading requirements. Clients can spot it a mile off.

If you have any sales pitch examples that work for you, feel free to share them in the comments!

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Michelle Lovrine Honeyager

Michelle Lovrine Honeyager is a freelance writer who has written features for a number of consumer and industry print magazines, as well as stories for niche websites, digital lifestyle magazines and general news sites.

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